Text size

Greyscale

High contrast

Current Weather

10°C

Places to see

Blueflag beaches

In the county that boasts the highest number of Blue Flag beaches and the longest coastline in the country; you are never too far from a beach. Whether your preference is the panoramic type of the small inlet cove, there are literally hundreds to explore.

Narin/Portnoo Blue Flag Beach

Narin, Portnoo

Naran (Phort Nua) Blue Flag Beach

Narin is a sheltered cove beach approximately 2km long on the Atlantic coast of Ireland. Approximately 2km from Portnoo, 8km from Ardara or 10km from Glenties this impressive Blue Flag beach has safe waters for bathing and is attended by a lifeguard during the summer months. There are toilet facilities near the beach with ample parking also available.

Local shops, bars and restaurants are within walking distance and there are three well-maintained caravan sites close to the strand area.

An extensive sandy beach in a rural environment. The beach is backed by an extensive and majestic sand dune system with a well defined primary dune ridge. The coastal area here is a designated NHA exhibiting a highly diverse range of both coastal and terrestrial habitats.

The beach at Narin can be found by traveling north on the R261 from Ardara and heading towards the village of Narin.

Lifeguard

Lifeguards are on duty in July and August everyday between 12.00 noon and 6.30pm.

First Aid

A First Aid kit is available at the Beach Lifeguard Hut-12.00 and 6.30pm

Although the village faces north into the Atlantic the hills to the west on Dunmore Head offer very welcome protection. The rocks on the shore near the pier tell the story of how this part of Donegal was formed, millions of years ago: you can see slates run through with veins of granite, and black crystalline limestone showing the effects of millennia of erosion by rain and sea spray.

Looking out to sea the first sight is the island of Inishkeel, Inis Caoil in Gaelic, which gives its name to the local parish, including the town of Glenties. Beyond Inishkeel one can see the estuary of the Gweebarra River and the southern edge of the Rosses. When the tide is low one can walk from Narin out to the island which is named after Conall Caol, the sixth century saint who is associated with many other places in the southwest of the county. The tide allows you around an hour to visit the sites, before walking back again. It is well worth a visit, with its early Christian churches, holy wells and beautifully decorated stone slabs.

General Advice

All beach users are asked to take care when at the beach, and in particular:

• Never swim alone - Or surf, dive or sail unless there is someone with you.

• Always engage in water activities with family or friends.

• Tell someone when you will be back.

• Note Locations of Life Saving Equipment - Before entering the water familiarize yourself with the location of lifebuoys.

• Report Missing or Damaged Lifesaving Equipment - If you find that lifebuoys are missing or vandalized, please contact the Blue Flag Co-ordinator, Donegal County Council, Central Laboratory, The Kube, Magheranan, Letterkenny. (074) 91 22787 or (074) 91 76276. Email - beaches@donegalcoco.ie

Check out also: www.blueflagireland.org

Information

Opens daily All Day
Closes daily All Day
Fee Free

Amenities

  • Cafe
  • Parking (free)
  • Toilets

Contact


Key to map

Please select categories you wish to view on the map.